General Setup and Diagram help..

Discussion in 'General' started by thepower220, May 22, 2009.

  1. thepower220

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    Hi there,

    I am totally a newbie with Asterisk and PBXs.

    I am reading online on how to set up a PBX but I thought I could create a PBX at my house where I can make a call with a standard phone over the internet to people.. Is this actually possible?

    If so, Can someone explain how to set it up? Not just the Elastix setup... I mean, what card do I need to purchase, what connection goes to the analog lines in the house, how I connect all the analog phones to the pbx, how do I connect a digital phone like a Cisco phone to the pbx with the RJ45 type cable to it?

    Sorry for all the questions.. but the more info I find, the more confusing it gets... No web site shows how to set it up only how to "Install" the software and it's done..

    Thanks

    Nate
     
  2. Bob

    Bob

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    Its probably because the rest is easy ;)

    However there is a more serious answer. Due the flexibility of the Elastix system (as with other IP PBX systems), there are hundreds of different ways & products that allow you to implement the system, and every day another use or way is put forward.

    However I do understand what you are asking, and it is a reasonable point.

    In your case, based on the info that you have provided, I have the following summary:

    1) You have PSTN (Analog) lines coming in to the house
    2) You have 1 or more Analog phones available to you and want to use these
    3) You want to connect a Cisco IP Phone to the system

    So what you need is:

    1) You are going to need a Computer with a Network Card:cheer:
    2) You will a TDM410 Card fitted with at least 1 x FXO module and 2 x FXS modules
    3) Cisco (SIP Based) IP Phone (if you haven't one already)
    4) 10/100mb Network Switch (probably a 4 or 5 port network switch will do for the moment) however if you do not have a power supply for your Cisco phone, then you may need a POE Switch which does cost. If you have a power supply for the Cisco, just a simple switch will do.

    Now the FXO modules on the TDM410, I have stated one only. I am assuming that in a house you have one analog telephone line. If you have two, you need two FXO modules. I am assuming that you have two analog phones, and hence you need to FXS Modules.

    The TDM410 card can take a maximum of 4 modules. If your total of analog phones and PSTN (analog) lines comes to more than 4 then you need to consider another card (e.g. Sangoma have a 5 Module card). As you can see, we are already trying to account for your setup being different from the next person.

    The Network Card from the ELastix system connects to a port on the switch, the Cisco IP Phone connects to a port on the switch, your ADSL router connects to a port on the switch.
    Your PSTN Line connects to the back of the ELastix box FXO port on the TDM410, and your analog phones connect to the FXS ports on the TDM410.

    Thats about it.

    If you describe in more detail exactly what you have, what you are trying to achieve, what model Cisco phone you have, how many analog phones you have, how many PSTN lines you have, then others can help you further with more exact details...

    Regards

    Bob
     
  3. thepower220

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    WOW... Thanks ROB.. That really helped!

    Well I have two analog lines one is my DSL and the other is the main line. I will only use the main line for the phone. I am not sure how the house is wired, I think the phones are daisy chained together.

    But What I want to do is connect the phones in the house to the Astrisk server so I can call over the internet and possibly get rid of my phone provider. However. I think that might not be possible because I need an actual phone number so people can call back.

    The Cisco IP phone thing I was thinking of buying one for my personal use so I can get rid of the one in my room. but I do not need one....
     
  4. dicko

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    Anecdotally, I had a friend who gleefully disconnected the number on his DSL line after getting his VOIP system working. This he found was a mistake!!.

    Most VOIP providers well sell you any number of DID's (phone numbers) and It might be possible for you to "port" your existing number to a VOIP provider(depending on where you live)

    Another possible solution for you would be an fxs/fxo hardware device like a linksys 3102, this device can be wired "in-line" between the phone line coming in and the rest of the house wiring Preferably at the CPE box (customer premise equipment) that the phone company has on the ouside of your house or at the first phone in the chain if more convenient , you then just connect the device to your network and have access to the fxo (line) and fxs (phones) interfaces separately. one advantage is that the analog line will fail-over to the local analog phones in the event that the voip system is dysfunctional for any reason
     
  5. Bob

    Bob

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    Nate,

    Thanks for the clarification. As you have seen from Dicko, another option, which is why it is very hard to write a "general" connectivity diagram. Glad you got something from what I wrote.

    So the final setup really is up to you. Do you want to just achieve VoIP Calls, in which case the SPA 3102 or similar device will give that capability with a simple setup or do you want to setup an Elastix PBX giving you the flexibility to expand, add new features etc and learn what it is all about.

    Either solution will work, it is probably a personal choice and a matter of budget.....

    Regards

    Bob
     
  6. thepower220

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    I would like to build a VOIP PBX so that I can have 4 phones i the house and each has their own extension. Then when someone calls all the phones ring then if I want to give the call to my parents, I can transfer the call to any of them so I don't have to yell downstairs. I would also like to make it so it is a community voice mail box for all the phones.

    I also want to make it so when I use the phones it goes over the internet for VOIP but I don't want to pay for service. Is this possible or do I need to find a VOIP service provider?

    Nate
     
  7. dicko

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  8. thepower220

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    As far as connections in the house, can I just run one wire to the box from one of the wall jacks and set up each phone or do I need to manually run new cable and do RJ11 punchdowns in each room?

    This might be easy to do for my room but the others are harder to do. I already have two RJ45 Jacks in my room and my dads office.
     
  9. dicko

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    Let's see now, No you can't but:-

    To largely re-iterate bob's earlier post, If you have a basic knowledge of electrical circuitry, then the pair of wires that come from the Telco is called an FXO(office) and has a voltage on it.

    This is a TRUNK that is modulated by analog signaling (an "ACTIVE" device), this live circuit is "terminated locally" to an FXO circuit which monitors and reacts to the voltage and can go "off-hook" (low impedance) and "grab" the line, or detect a ring signal and go "off-hook" and "answer" the line.

    Traditional analog Phones are "PASSIVE" devices that can share a pair of wires with other phones, they will all behave the same. this is an FXS(station) which is provided voltage and signaling from your FXS port, it will respond to those same signals that come from the TELCO and go "off-hook" or ring to suit.

    You need to INTERCEPT (i.e. BREAK or CUT and that's IMPORTANT) the physical "ACTIVE" from physical "PASSIVE" pairs.

    This is best done at the connection closest to the "TELCO Central Office" (CPE, Customer Premise Equipment).

    Connect the TELCO to an FXO interface and the "analog phones" to an FXS interface and you have separated the "ACTIVE" devices from the "PASSIVE" devices and can thus monitor the line signals, both FXO and FXS, and control who gets what and what they can do with it with Elastix/asterisk.

    I don't know where you live but (you said RJ11 so I guess the US) , often all the jacks are "daisy-chained" with at least one but often more, (especially here if the house is less than 20 years old where blue-white/white-blue is pair one, and will usually be on the red/green wires of the customer wiring. Orange-white/white-orange is pair 2 and these would be on the black/yellow customer wiring. (if your lucky, green then brown etc)).

    If you have extra pairs of wires you can send an extension signal to each of those extra pairs from another FXS port and rewire each wall jack to the extension you want them to ring for.

    You will be limited to internal analog extensions (not phones) by the number of pairs you have available, if necessary you WILL have to pull more cable. (or cheat and use the blue and brown pair of the (non POE) rj45 wiring, oops, that might get me in trouble,

    If you need and can support more than 1 FXO and 1 FXS then bob's original solution is probably better and cheaper than mine.

    Hope that helped.
     

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